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Front Page » Top Stories » Cleanup of Miami River tributaries to start in May

Cleanup of Miami River tributaries to start in May

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Written by on April 4, 2017

Cleanup of Miami River tributaries to start in May

The long-awaited cleanup of Wagner Creek and Seybold Canal is expected to start next month, says Horacio Stuart Aguirre, Miami River Commission chairman.
Cleanup of the long-polluted Miami River tributary comes two years after the city commission approved the Wagner Creek and Seybold Canal Maintenance Dredging and Environmental Cleanup Project.
The city has lined up the permits and money for the $23 million dredging and cleanup, but a start has been delayed as the city procurement department wrangled with bidders. Eventually, the city rejected all bids and started a fresh solicitation last summer.
“The Miami River Commission is appreciative that after the second request for proposals the City of Miami has recommended Sevenson Environmental Services Inc…. to conduct the fully-funded and permitted Wagner Creek and Seybold Canal Maintenance Dredging and Environmental Cleanup Project,” Mr. Aguirre said this week.
He said city officials estimate dredging will begin in May.
“The Miami River Commission thanks the City of Miami, Florida Inland Navigation District and the State of Florida for funding the project, which will improve the local economy and remove toxic sediments, including dioxin, from the most polluted waterway in the State of Florida,” he said.
The project aims to remove accumulated sediments and dioxins, a hazardous chemical bound to the sediments, and restore stormwater capacity in Wagner Creek and Seybold Canal.
Dredging is to start where Wagner Creek flows out of a culvert at Northwest 20th Street and continue to where Seybold Canal empties into the river 2.5 miles away. The plan is to excavate accumulated contaminated sediment and truck it to a landfill.
Sevenson says it has done more than 1,400 projects with a total value of more than $4.2 billion, including cleanup at the infamous Love Canal.

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