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Front Page » Profile » Eduardo Padroacuten Guides Nations Largest Community College To Offer Lowcost Quality Education Despite State Aid Cutback

Eduardo Padroacuten Guides Nations Largest Community College To Offer Lowcost Quality Education Despite State Aid Cutback

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Written by on January 5, 2012

Since moving to the United States as a refugee at 15, Eduardo Padrón has spent 41 years at Miami Dade College, working his way through the ranks at the only school he said would give him a chance after high school.

Since graduating from the college, Dr. Padrón has worked as an assistant professor of economics, department chair, division director, associate dean, dean, vice president, campus president and now college president.

His goal is to ensure that all students, young and old, rich or poor, receive access to a quality education at a low cost.

"Opportunity changes everything," he said, "and our concern is making sure that people who have the least opportunity are given a chance to get an education… Education is the passport to a better life."

As head of one of the most diverse institutions in the nation, in 2003 he pushed to receive state approval to offer bachelor’s degrees through the college. He has advocated on behalf of the Dream Act to provide those born outside the US with lower tuition costs and been asked to serve on the White House Commission on Education Excellence for Hispanic Americans, where he works to provide educational opportunities to all nationalities.

"This institution has changed many lives," he said, "and it’s demonstrated that you can have open access and excellent academic programs. The students who finish here are second to none and are able to compete in the best universities in the country."

Dr. Padrón discussed his plans to provide Miami-Dade residents with a quality education, how he plans to counter recent reductions in state funding and what the college is doing to better the community with Miami Today staff writer Ashley Hopkins at his downtown office.To read the entire issue of Miami Today online, subscribe to e -Miami Today, an exact digital replica of the printed edition. To read this profile article in its entirety, subscribe to e-MiamiToday. With the e-MiamiToday you will be able to read the entire contents of Miami Today online exactly as it appears in print. Or order this issue, to receive a regular printed copy of this week’s Miami Today. You may also subscribe to the printed edition of Miami Today to receive the newspaper every week by mail. If you are reading this in Miami Today’s “Online Archive” as an archived web page and would like to see the entire article that was published, call Miami Today, 305-358-2663 and ask for the Circulation Department.   Top Front Page About Miami Today Put Your Message in Miami Today Contact Miami Today © Copyright 2012 Miami Today designed and produced by Green Dot Advertising and Marketingvar gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”));var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-4990655-1″);pageTracker._initData();pageTracker._trackPageview();

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