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Front Page » Top Stories » Study Of 6 Sites Miamis Vote On Stadium Due

Study Of 6 Sites Miamis Vote On Stadium Due

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Written by on March 8, 2001

By Paola Iuspa
Critical decisions face Miami commissioners in the next week about the use of city land and whether or not any parcel will become home to a stadium for the Florida Marlins.

On Monday, city-hired experts will submit to City Manager Carlos Gimenez their analyses of eight proposals to build a 40,000-seat stadium and the county’s Metropolitan Planning Organization will release a study showing how a stadium would affect traffic around several of the proposed sites, according to agency Director Jose Luis Mesa.

"Our consultants are putting about 200 hours into this report," he said. "They are looking at how the traffic would flow, how long it would take the traffic to clear up after the games and the different access points available or needed."

The Community Improvement Authority, a group created by Gov. Jeb Bush and entrusted with writing stadium site and financing recommendations, will meet at 11 a.m. March 14 in the Main Library, 101 W Flagler St., said Rafael Rodon, a member.

"The idea is to come up with recommendations — possibly from both the site committee and the full authority board — that will go before the City of Miami," Mr. Rodon said.

On Thursday, the commission will discuss the experts’ analyses and the authority’s recommendations during a hearing at 2 p.m. in the Manuel Artime Community Center, 900 SW First St.

Commissioners are rushing to meet a self-imposed March 15 deadline after they failed to vote on the issue in February.

Mr. Gimenez said the city’s experts are spending equal time studying each site, though three of five commissioners have said they do not want the stadium in Bicentennial Park.

The city commission agreed in February to provide land for the stadium as long as the city gets revenues and is uninvolved in financing.

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