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Front Page » Transportation » 150 more red light camera sites coming

150 more red light camera sites coming

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Written by on November 27, 2013

150 more red light camera sites coming

Miami-Dade is moving forward with its plan to install red-light cameras in at least 150 intersections.

The county’s attorneys are reviewing a draft of what will be a formal solicitation for vendors who would install the cameras and manage the system, says Miriam Singer, assistant director of procurement management services in the Internal Services Department.

The latest draft for the Red Light Camera Program states that the county has experienced a growing problem with drivers failing to stop for red lights.

“This trend is not unique to the county as the problem has increased throughout the state of Florida and nationally,” the draft says. “Florida has been ranked as one of the most dangerous states for drivers, with Miami-Dade County having the largest volume of traffic accidents. In 2004, the Florida Highway Patrol reported that running red lights led to approximately 8,900 accidents, 115 deaths, more than 10,000 injuries and $77 million in property damages.”

Cameras are to be placed at arterial intersections designated by the county where data have shown a high-level of violations or a frequency of right-angle collisions probably caused by running of red traffic signals, according to the draft.

It states that the program will be arranged in phases, with the initial implementation phase of 50 intersections. Additional intersections will be added, via Notice to Proceed, to a total of 150 intersections, the draft says, though the county reserves the option to add 50 more.

The scope of work specifies that the selected proposer will be responsible for furnishing all equipment, materials, personnel, management, office space, hardware, software, system power and any other requirement to operate the program in accordance with the requirements of the request for proposals and sate law.

The Red Light Camera Program also asks the selected vendor to provide such services as a 60-day public awareness educational program and working with the county departments that interface with the program.

According to the draft, only warnings will be mailed to those who commit red-light infractions during the public awareness period.

“Upon completion of the 60-day period, notices of violations or citations will be issued and violators will be subject to the fine under Florida Statutes,” it states, which dictates this type of violation calls for a $158 fine.

The county asks the selected proposer to include payments methods such as check, Internet based through the use of bank accounts and credit cards, Paypal or similar methods, and payment by phone using a credit or debit card.

“The county would prefer that this service be available 24 hours and seven days a week. However, this service shall be available a minimum of five days per week, and a minimum of ten hours per day,” the draft states.

The draft specifies that the Red Light Program must come at no cost for Miami-Dade and that it is to bring revenue to the county.

Proposers answering the request for proposals are to put forward a monthly fee per camera that the county would pay, subject to prior negotiations. Each camera is to have a separate accounting for revenue generating and fee purposes on a monthly basis, the draft states, and all costs associated with each camera would be covered by the chosen company, as well as any income not met by the camera during that period.

The fee the county would pay to the selected proposer each month would be 40% of the total revenue generated by the program at the most.

The draft also addresses the fee the county would charge a red-light camera violator who requested a hearing. The state legislation allows for local governments to charge up to $250 to cover the cost of providing it. Miami-Dade is proposing a $150 charge.

Just this year the Florida Legislature gave municipalities the option of providing a local hearing for violators. The ordinance to create it in the county is on the Dec. 3 county commission agenda.

5 Responses to 150 more red light camera sites coming

  1. Henry

    November 27, 2013 at 5:41 pm

    Earlier this year the West Palm Beach commissioners heard a speech (with tears) by red light camera promoter Melissa Wandall – and then they approved 52 more cameras.

    Now it’s 150 more in Miami Dade.

    It’s been eleven years since Mark Wandall died, long enough so we shouldn’t have to tiptoe around anymore.

    The driver of the car in which Wandall’s husband Mark was riding had been drinking. Not legally drunk, but buzzed. He hit the gas when his green arrow came on, evidently without confirming that opposing traffic had stopped. If he had not been buzzed he might have noticed, directly in front of him and coming straight at him, the headlights of the red light runner.

    The driver was Ms. Wandall’s brother. You can imagine that if it had been anyone else driving, Ms. Wandall (or anyone else) would have sued the driver for his last dime. But she couldn’t do that, couldn’t punish her brother, so she has punished us, with red light cameras.

    Mark Wandall’s death is a lesson for us to teach our children of driving age: Drive defensively – and don’t drive buzzed. (They’re connected, because when you are buzzed, you drop your defenses.) In particular, don’t swing a left turn – even with a green arrow – until you’ve looked around. I would welcome a campaign by Ms. Wandall that focused on that particular lesson. She’s a good speaker and could save a lot of lives, nationwide. And no one would have to install cameras.

  2. Paul Henry

    November 28, 2013 at 2:08 am

    It’s great to see some crash numbers, albeit from 2004 (for which there were 96 fatal red light violation or RLV crashes). I wonder why the RLV deaths from 2005-2010 are not there? They are available online on the DHSMV website in a publication called “Traffic Crash Facts”. Here are the numbers (the camera scheme was enacted effective July 2010):
    2005: 96 (no change)

    2006: 123 (+27)

    2007: 107 (-16)

    2008: 76 (-31)

    2009: 56 (-20)

    2010: 53 (-3)

    Then there is 2011. For some reason, the DHSMV did not publish numbers for crash causes that year. Perhaps it is due to the number of fatal crashes jumping to 72 (+19). 2011 was the first full year of the camera scheme, and these numbers do not lie. No camera on a pole will magically awaken or make sober an inattentive or drunk driver. These crashes, like others, fluctuate.

    The camera scheme exists to make money. This is further evidenced in the clause that the scheme must bring revenue to the county.

  3. Stephen

    November 28, 2013 at 5:04 pm

    banthecams.org/index.php/articles/read-light-camera/4906-paul-henry-exposes-data-miami-dade-rlc-dont-want-to-bring-up

    Quote: Paul Henry Exposes Data Miami-Dade RLC DON’T Want to bring up!

    http://www.facebook.com/groups/banthecams/669290023111023/?notif_t=group_activity

    150 more RLC in the state of Dade (Miami). Note the revenue provision in the contract. How about a crash reduction provision? Then there is the crash data from nearly 10 years ago. As usual, my comment awaits moderation. I’ve copied it below.

    http://www.miamitodaynews.com/2013/11/27/150-red-light-camera-sites-coming/#comment-526

    It’s great to see some crash numbers, albeit from 2004 (for which there were 96 fatal red light violation or RLV crashes). I wonder why the RLV deaths from 2005-2010 are not there? They are available online on the DHSMV website in a publication called “Traffic Crash Facts”. Here are the numbers (the camera scheme was enacted effective July 2010):
    2005: 96 (no change)

    2006: 123 (+27)

    2007: 107 (-16)

    2008: 76 (-31)

    2009: 56 (-20)

    2010: 53 (-3)

    Then there is 2011. For some reason, the DHSMV did not publish numbers for crash causes that year. Perhaps it is due to the number of fatal crashes jumping to 72 (+19). 2011 was the first full year of the camera scheme, and these numbers do not lie. No camera on a pole will magically awaken or make sober an inattentive or drunk driver. These crashes, like others, fluctuate.

    The camera scheme exists to make money. This is further evidenced in the clause that the scheme must bring revenue to the county.

    http://www.motorists.org
    http://www.banthecams.org
    camerafraud on Facebook

  4. Stephen

    November 28, 2013 at 5:08 pm

    Also note that any “cost neutral” contracts ARE REALLY PER TICKET, AND LIKLEY ILLEGAL! (CA COURTS HAVE RULED “cost neutral” contracts illegal already http://www.thenewspaper.com/news/34/3499.asp).

    http://www.thenewspaper.com/news/36/3623.asp

    Under severe budgetary pressures, local jurisdictions often sign contracts with vendors that were presented with a slick marketing campaign. Such deals often contain extremely unfavorable terms. The public is hurt by per-ticket payment systems — often disguised with “cost neutral” contract language — that ensure that the system is designed to maximize revenue, not safety. Such provisions provide a monetary incentive to increase the number of tickets issued. That leads to other provisions prohibiting cities from lengthening yellow light duration to improve safety and requiring right on red ticketing and ticket approval quotas.

  5. James C. Walker

    December 2, 2013 at 4:07 pm

    The level of greed with cameras is Miami-Dade is truly appalling.

    Adding one second to the yellow intervals to negate the malicious change in the rules to allow deliberately setting yellow intervals too short adopted by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) in July 2011 would almost certainly drop the straight through violation rates by 60% to 90% and they would STAY down, contrary to the false claims of camera vendors.

    I understand FDOT’s rule, the state gets 52.5% of the fine revenue without paying a penny of the high cameras costs. Pure greed.

    But WHY won’t governments like Miami-Dade set safer longer yellow intervals to drastically reduce violation rates? Several million dollars in camera profits is the answer. Fine revenue trumps safety in Miami-Dade and in many other Florida communities.

    And at least 99.6% of all right on red camera tickets anywhere in Florida are about $$$, not safety, because federal research shows only 0.4% of crashes at signalized intersections involve a right on red turn – and only 0.06% of crashes with an injury or fatality do.

    Red light cameras are a predatory money grab racket, one that would likely be deemed a criminal enterprise if governments were not business partners with the for-profit camera vendors.

    Contact your state Representatives and Senators to insist they support the bills to ban cameras in the 2014 legislative session. Get a commitment from your area legislators to do this and let them know this WILL be an issue that affects your future votes.

    James C. Walker, Life Member-National Motorists Association

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